Wednesday, 17 December 2014

RINGO : THE AWARD FOR MUSICAL EXCELLENCE

Ringo is one of the greatest and most creative drummers in rock and roll history. He got to know the members of the Beatles while both groups were playing clubs in Hamburg, Germany, and occasionally sat in with them. 


He joined the group in August 1962, providing the musicianship and personality that the group needed to become stars. Starr’s drumming was key to the Beatles’ overall sound. Their songs rested on his always-steady backbeat, and he added creative, memorable fills on songs like “Ticket to Ride” (1965) and “A Day in the Life,” (1967), one of his finest moments on record. 




Throughout the Beatles’ career he sang on many lighthearted and funny songs (“Yellow Submarine,” “Octopus’s Garden”), providing sly humor and clever turns of phrase that helped cultivate the group’s image and persona. Starr was the first Beatle to have significant solo hits in the 1970s. “Back Off Boogaloo,” “It Don’t Come Easy,” “Photograph,” “Oh My My” and “The No No Song” dominated the U.S. and U.K. charts. His 1973 album Ringo, produced by Richard Perry, is the best representation of this period – a time during which he also played on some of the best Beatle solo records of the era, such as George Harrison’s All Things Must Pass and John Lennon’s Plastic Ono Band. Starr’s revival with the All-Starr Band has lead to the recording of a series of strong albums, including Time Takes Time (1992), Ringorama (2003) and Liverpool 8 (2008), a reflective album about his birthplace. Starr continues to be a vital rock and roll musician.

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